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Posted on 12-21-2015

Holiday Pet Hazards

The Holidays are joyful times but they can be hazardous to your pets. Here are some things to watch out for this season!

Garland/tinsel/icicles

These popular Christmas decorations can be an irresistible toy to cats and dogs alike, but especially cats. Pets can get carried away and eat bits of garland or tinsel. The material can cause a fatal blockage in their intestines. It’s best to keep a close eye on your furry friends and keep them away from this danger. Some signs of a blockage are: loss of interest in eating, no defecation, frequent vomiting, lethargy. If you suspect your pet has eaten garland/tinsel/icicles call your vet or a vet emergency clinic immediately.

Ribbon

The pretty ribbons that adorn holiday presents can also be tantalizing to cats. If a cat eats ribbon it can have a fatal intestinal blockage. It’s best to clean up all the wrapping paper and ribbon after presents are opened to protect you kitty pals. If you notice your pet displaying the symptoms listed above, consider calling your vet or an vet emergency clinic right away.

Chocolate

While it’s nice to have a box of chocolates set out on a cocktail table this time of year, don’t let Fido swoop in for a mouthful. Dogs can be poisoned by excess chocolate, so it’s best to keep candy where your canine companion can’t reach it.

Electrical cords and batteries

The holidays are a time for festive lights and electric toys. Some dogs may think that electrical cords (like the ones for the lights on a Christmas tree) are a chew-toy. If your dog chews through a cord it will get a nasty (maybe fatal) shock, and may even cause a short circuit that can light your house on fire. Many toys these days are battery powered, but be careful that your dog does not get into the habit of chewing batteries. The chemicals inside are not good for your dog, and if your dog should happen to swallow a battery, surgery will likely be required to remove it.

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